October 22

9:00 am—Music and Prayer with Worship Team

Impact Hour streams live at 10 am

Sermon streams live at about 11:45 am

Click on “Livestream” or "Listen Live" at cornerstonelakeside.com

Recordings are also available

10:00 am—Impact Hour:  Del Lewis

"Share Jesus Without Fear" session 1

11:00 am—Worship for all ages

 

11:30 am— Children’s Church and Nursery meet in Creekview Room

Morning Message:  Pastor Clay Stidham

"Manifested unto Us"

Hebrews 11:1

1 John 1:1-10, 2:1-2

1 Timothy:3:16

Isaiah 40:5-8

James 1:10-11, 4:13-14

2 Corinthians 5:1-8

John 20:29

 

12:15 pm—Commitment and Dismissal

 

Announcements

October 22--November 12—Del Lewis teaches “Share Jesus Without Fear” in the Impact Hour 10 am

November 1—Men's Bible Study 7 pm at Office "Isaiah"

November 11—Women's Tea Team meeting at Office.  10 am

This Week

October 23—Monday Marys Bible Study 10 am at Cornerstone Office "Me, Myself and Lies" by Jennifer Rothchild.

 

 

Word for Worship

 

The Sinner's Prayer

 

“And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner.” (Luke 18:13)

Evangelists have often urged lost men and women to pray this “sinner’s prayer” if they desired to be saved. The account does say that this publican, after praying thus, “went down to his house justified” (v. 14).

But there is more here than appears on the surface. It is not merely God’s mercy that is needed for He has already been merciful to let us continue to live at all. The word translated “merciful” is used only one other time in the New Testament and is there translated “make reconciliation for.” Speaking of the saving work of Christ, it says that He came “to make reconciliation for the sins of the people” (Hebrews 2:17). It is also closely related to the words for “propitiation” and “mercy seat.”

This parable of the Pharisee and the publican is set in the context of the Jewish temple worship, where sinners would bring their sacrificial offerings to cover their sins, knowing that “it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul” (Leviticus 17:11). Such sacrifices were completely worthless, however, if offered in a spirit of religious pride and/or self-righteousness, like those of the Pharisee. There must be repentance and faith in God’s promise of forgiveness through the death of an innocent substitute, pre-figuring the true Lamb of God whose coming death would truly make eternal reconciliation for the sins of the people. The publican prayed in this vein, and he was saved.

In our day, on the other side of the cross, a sinner’s saving prayer must say, in effect: “God, be propitiated to me on the basis of the death of Christ for my sins.” Such a prayer, offered in sincere repentance and faith in God’s promise, brings justification before God. HMM