July 29

9:00 am—Music and Prayer with Worship Team

Impact Hour streams live at 10 am

Sermon streams live at about 11:45 am

Click on “Livestream” or "Listen Live" at cornerstonelakeside.com

Recordings are also available

10:00 am—Impact Hour:  Del Lewis

“Searching and Finding Purpose in our Walk With God” Session 3

11:00 am—Worship for all ages

 

11:30 am— Children’s Church and Nursery meet in Creekview Room

Morning Message:  Pastor Clay Stidham

The Kinsman Redeemer”

Ruth 4

Matthew 13:44

Isaiah 62:1-3, 10-12

Deuteronomy 32:21

Acts 10:34-48

Ephesians 3:1-12

Revelation 5:1-9

12:15 pm—Commitment and Dismissal

 

Calendar

August 1—Men’s Bible Study 7 pm at Office

August 3—Prayer Meeting at home of Arnie Abrams 7-8 pm

August 4—Young Life Pool/pizza party 5:30 pm 

Show Low Aquatic Center

August 5—I-Teen 11:45 am in Hampton breakfast area

August 7—Young Life Prayer/planning at Office 6 pm

August 13—Monday Marys fellowship 10 am at Ebert home

  

Word for Worship

How Bacteria Help Our Bodies Survive

Within the past 20 years or so, dozens of papers have been written regarding the human microbiome. Microbiota inhabit a variety of niches in the human body, with the gut being the primary location. Remarkably, “The human gut has the highest known cell densities of any microbial habitat on Earth.”1 The number of microbiome cells number into the trillions for a single person.

Our relationship with our microbiome has been quite intimate from creation because the microbiota accomplishes vital tasks for us.Tweet: Our relationship with our microbiome has been quite intimate from creation because the microbiota accomplishes vital tasks for us.

How Bacteria Help Our Bodies Survive: http://www.icr.org/article/bacteria-help-us-survive

@icrscience

#Science #Research

Our relationship with our microbiome has been quite intimate from creation because the microbiota accomplishes vital tasks for us. For example, we have been designed with the bidirectional “microbiome–gut–brain axis.” This includes communication channels between our central nervous system (CNS), gut flora, GI tract and the countless signaling events that take place between them.2 Researcher Dr. Mayer, et al, went on to say,

The discovery of the size and complexity of the human microbiome has resulted in an ongoing reevaluation of many concepts of health and disease, including diseases affecting the CNS.2

It has been found that endocrine and other signals produced by the gut microbiota can affect the brain—and the brain can, in turn, impact microbial function and composition by way of endocrine secretions. These bidirectional communication channels must have an innate interface system that fully controls the harmony between us humans and the microbes we host. This is called a microbe interface system.
 
Scientists recently discovered that gut molecules control brain inflammation via “long-distance regulation of immune cells in the brain.”3 Tryptophan is an amino acid our bodies use to make proteins. Gut bacteria process a component (metabolite) of tryptophan that in turn passes into the CNS. These metabolites attach to a specific receptor called AHR in the brain. AHR is a transcription factor (also called a sequence-specific DNA-binding factor) expressed in special cells called astrocytes and microglia. Basically, AHR binds to the DNA (genes) that encodes a protein that improves the responsiveness of astrocytes to inflammation of the CNS. Perhaps “this pathway might support the repair of injured neural cells.”3

ICR views the trillions of microbes in our microbiome as creatures designed by God to work in harmonious relationships with other organisms and body systems.Tweet: ICR views the trillions of microbes in our microbiome as creatures designed by God to work in harmonious relationships with other organisms and body systems.

How Bacteria Help Our Bodies Survive http://www.icr.org/article/bacteria-help-us-survive

@icrscience

#Science #Research

This symbiotic cooperation is hardly the war-like paradigm of microbe-human relations described by evolutionists and even some creationists. Research at ICR views the trillions of microbes in our microbiome as creatures designed by God to work in harmonious relationships with other organisms and body systems.   

References  
1. Ley, R. E. et al. 2006. Ecological and evolutionary forces shaping microbial diversity in the human intestineCell. 124 (4): 837-848.
2. Mayer, E. A., R. Knight, S. K. Mazmanian. et al. 2014. Gut microbes and the brain: paradigm shift in neuroscience. Journal of Neuroscience. 34 (46): 15490–15496.
3. Wekerle, H. 2018. Gut molecules control brain inflammationNature. 557:643.

Mr. Frank Sherwin is Research Associate, Senior Lecturer, and Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

DNA Paramedics Repair Chromosomes

In the mid-1800s, a mild Augustinian friar named Gregor Mendel crossbred pea plants and pioneered the beginnings of understanding inherited traits. Genetics has come a long way since then.

Neither Mendel nor Charles Darwin knew anything about the incredible molecule of life, DNA. Today, papers are published daily in science journals describing new discoveries of DNA’s role as a regulator and repairman.

Scientists have known for decades that DNA can be damaged by too much sun (UV radiation) or exposure to harmful chemicals and carcinogens. Upon examination of damaged DNA, the researchers discovered that whole families of submicroscopic repair enzymes (tiny machines) were constantly restoring the damaged DNA.1 It has been estimated that as many as one million individual molecular lesions (trauma) of DNA occur per cell per day that need repair.2 Since we are designed with trillions of cells, you can imagine the sheer number of tiny repair enzymes hard at work in each person!

Now a U.S.C. Dornsife study reveals a molecule that “walks” damaged DNA to a kind of emergency room in the cell.3 Using florescent markers, scientists “saw how the cell launches an emergency response to repair broken DNA strands from a type of tightly-packed DNA, heterochromatin.” Heterochromatin are areas of the genome in which little is known due to their lack of protein-coding genes. However, researchers think that damage in some heterochromatin may possibly lead to cancer.

The study describes that after the strands of DNA are injured, tiny filaments of a protein called actin form, producing a road to the edge of the nucleus. This is what the myosin (the “paramedics”) use to travel along the actin road with the broken DNA. The “emergency room” is a complex pore at the nuclear edge. As Assistant Professor Irene Chiolo said, “What we think is happening here is that the damage triggers a defense mechanism that quickly builds the road, the actin filament, while also turning on an ambulance, the myosin.”3

In an interesting admission, the article stated that repetitious DNA sequences in heterochromatin were for several decades referred to as “junk DNA.” But with more research “studies have shown that repeated DNA sequences are in fact essential for many nuclear activities.”3

Creationists believe God doesn’t make junk.Tweet: Creationists believe God doesn’t make junk.

DNA Paramedics Repair Chromosomes: http://www.icr.org/article/dna-paramedics-repair-chromosomes

@icrscience

#Science #DNA

Creationists believe God doesn’t make junk. In addition, these numerous submicroscopic protein machines walking along countless actin highways reflect what the apostle Paul said in Romans 1:20—God’s creation is “clearly seen.”

References

  1. Sherwin, F. 2004. Mending Mistakes—The Amazing Ability of RepairActs & Facts. 33 (6); and Thomas, B. 2008. DNA Repair Enzymes: Vital Links in the Chain of Life. Creation Science Update. Posted on ICR.org August 27, 2008, accessed July 1, 2018.
  2. Lodish, H. et al. 2013. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th ed. New York: Freeman, 151.
  3. “Walking molecules” haul away damaged DNA to the cell’s emergency roomPhysOrg. Posted on phys.org June 20, 2018, accessed June 21, 2018.

* Mr. Frank Sherwin is Research Associate, Senior Lecturer, and Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

Article posted on July 24, 2018.

 

Good Courage

“Be strong and of a good courage: for unto this people shalt thou divide for an inheritance the land, which I sware unto their fathers to give them.” (Joshua 1:6)

This admonition to be strong and of “good courage” (Hebrew amass) is given some ten times in the Old Testament, plus another nine times using a different word (chasaq). The first occurrence of amass is in Deuteronomy 3:28, where it is translated “strengthen”: “But charge Joshua, and encourage him, and strengthen him: for he shall go over before this people, and he shall cause them to inherit the land which thou shalt see.”

Christians today surely need good courage to face a dangerous world with all its temptations and intimidations, but nothing today could compare to the challenge facing Joshua. Trying to lead a nondescript multitude of “stiff-necked” desert nomads into a land of giants and walled cities would surely require courage beyond anything we could imagine today.

But Joshua had access to invincible resources, and so do we. “Be strong and of a good courage,” God told him. “Be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the LORD thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest” (Joshua 1:9).

Giants and walled cities are no match for the children of God when He goes with them, for “if God be for us, who can be against us?” (Romans 8:31).

God did go with Joshua, and the Israelites defeated the giants, destroyed the walled cities, and took the land. And we have the same promise today, for “he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee. So that we may boldly say, The Lord is my helper, and I will not fear what man shall do unto me” (Hebrews 13:5-6). Courage is really another name for faith, and “what he had promised, he was able also to perform” (Romans 4:21). HMM